Happy Howl-oween!

Posted on October 31, 2008 under Pet Health & Safety

Posted by Pets Best on 10/31/2008 in Articles from Newsletters

Enjoying Halloween with your pets can be a hairy problem. Or it can be a real treat. You’re the best judge of how your pet will react to this happy—but hectic—holiday, but chances are good that with a bit of planning, everyone, including your furry family members, can get into the spirit.

Holiday Stress
Animal experts warn that dogs or cats, even those who are usually tolerant of strangers, can become stressed on Halloween night, with a steady stream of strangers in strange costumes ringing your doorbell and shouting “trick or treat!”

Even if your pet is normally friendly, keep an eye out for any aggressive or fearful reactions. If you choose to crate your animal or keep them contained in any way, they should be kept in a quiet, safe place—otherwise, stress could result in diarrhea or potential injury.

Safety First
With loose pets, remember to keep candles and jack o’ lanterns out of the way—a sprinting cat or a wagging dog’s tail could result in a blaze. All pets, especially black cats, should be kept indoors, safe from Halloween pranksters.

Sticky Situations
Be sure to keep treats out of pets’ reach—chewing and swallowing lollipop sticks or candy wrappers can result in intestinal obstruction or rupture, which are serious emergencies. Children should be warned not to share candy with pets, particularly chocolate, which is toxic to them. If you think your pet has eaten chocolate, watch for tremors, vomiting, diarrhea, or an increased heart rate, and call your veterinarian immediately. Chocolate poisoning is an emergency situation.

Best Dressed Pets
There are lots of Halloween costumes for pets in the stores these days. While dressing your pet up can be fun and oh-so cute, you should be careful. Don’t leave your costumed pet unsupervised, as they might try to chew their costume and could choke on bits of material. If your pet is frightened and tries to run away, the costume could get caught on a bush or fence, entangling the animal.

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