Pet Insurance Blog – Pets Best Insurance
Get a Pet Insurance Quoteor call 877-738-7237

Another reason you need cat insurance: Diabetes

Posted on: September 13th, 2011 by

A cat with diabetes who has cat insurance drinks lots of water.

By: Dr. Jane Matheys
Associate Veterinarian
The Cat Doctor Veterinary Hospital
For Pets Best Insurance

Diabetes mellitus, otherwise known as just plain “diabetes,” is a serious disease in which a cat’s body either doesn’t produce insulin or doesn’t properly use insulin. During digestion, the fats, carbohydrates and proteins that are consumed in the diet are broken down into smaller components that can be utilized by cells in the body. One component is glucose, or blood sugar, a fuel that provides the energy needed to sustain life. Because diabetes can be a very serious and very expensive condition, you should research the best pet insurance for your cat, and purchase a policy that will cover this condition.

Insulin is a hormone produced in the pancreas and is responsible for regulating the flow of glucose from the bloodstream into the cells of the body. Without an adequate amount of insulin, glucose is unable to get into the cells and it accumulates in the blood. When insulin is deficient, the cells become starved for a source of energy. In response to this, the body starts breaking down stores of fat and protein to use as alternate energy sources. As a consequence, the cat eats more. Therefore, a cat can have weight loss despite an increased or ravenous appetite.

The body tries to eliminate the excess glucose in the blood by eliminating it in the urine. However, glucose attracts water, so urine glucose takes large quantities of the body’s fluids with it, resulting in a large amount of urine. To avoid dehydration, the cat will drink more water. Thus you will see a cat with diabetes exhibit four classical signs of the disease: weight loss, increased appetite, increased water consumption, and increased urination. When these symptoms present themselves, it’s important to get your cat to your veterinarian right away. Having cat insurance can help diminish sometimes high costs in diagnosing this condition.

Two types of diabetes mellitus have been discovered in cats. In Type I diabetes, the cat’s body generates little to no insulin due to an insufficient number of pancreatic cells capable of producing insulin. This is the most common type of feline diabetes and is also known as Insulin Dependent Diabetes. As the name implies, cats with this type require insulin injections to stabilize blood sugar. In Type II diabetes, the pancreas may produce insulin, but the body’s cells have difficulty making efficient use of it. This is called “insulin resistance.” Most cats with Type II diabetes eventually progress to Type I and require insulin also. During September’s Pet Health Insurance Month, watch for signs and symptoms of either form of diabetes in your kitty.

While diabetes can affect any cat, it most often occurs in older or obese animals. Because of this, it’s a good idea to get your cat signed up for pet health insurance while they are young– so issues, like diabetes, that develop later in life, will be covered. Unfortunately, since the incidence if obesity is rising in our pets, the incidence of diabetes is increasing also, similar to the trend seen in people. The exact cause of the disease is unknown. Obesity is the major predisposing condition, but chronic pancreatitis, other hormonal diseases and certain medications, such as steroids, have all been linked to the disease.

In addition to increased thirst and urination and weight loss, some affected cats may also exhibit a flat-footed gait with their hind feet, rather than walking up on their paws. This condition is called diabetic neuropathy, and is a result of prolonged high blood glucose on the cat’s nerves. Most diabetic cats remain bright and alert. owever, if an owner has not recognized the signs of diabetes early, a condition called ketoacidosis can develop and the cat may become very ill if medical care is not sought. Cats in this situation may become depressed, weak and dehydrated. They may also experience vomiting, diarrhea, loss of appetite and severe weight loss. Therefore, it is important to be aware of the signs of diabetes so the condition can be recognized and treated early.

In addition to performing physical examinations, veterinarians will use laboratory analyses of blood and urine samples to diagnose diabetes mellitus. Occasionally, frightened or stressed cats may also have a fairly high blood glucose level which can be confused with diabetes. A specialized test, called a fructosamine test, can distinguish between the two and can also be very helpful in understanding difficult cases.

Treating diabetes is usually a rewarding endeavor, and a diabetic cat can live many healthy years. All diabetic cats do best with consistent medication, consistent feeding, and a stable, stress-free lifestyle.

The first step in treatment is to alter your cat’s diet. Cats are obligate carnivores. hey have very little requirement for carbohydrates. Canned diets high in protein and low in carbohydrate are preferred because of how cats digest and metabolize their food. For some cats, this type of diet alone may control the disease. For many other cats, this diet may at least decrease the amount of insulin the cat needs to control the diabetes. It is important to keep this in mind so that your cat does not get too much insulin. If your cat is overweight, you will need to help him lose weight gradually. Your veterinarian can help you choose the best diet for your cat, and can tailor a safe weight loss program.

Most diabetic cats require insulin injections administered under the skin twice daily. Although many people are initially fearful of giving insulin injections, for most cats, injections are much easier than giving tablets, and both the cat and the owner handle it very well.

Several types of insulin are used in cats. Some are made for use in humans and obtained from regular pharmacies, while others are made for pets and obtained through your veterinarian. The current recommended insulin in cats is a human insulin called glargine. Recent studies indicate that newly diagnosed diabetic cats started on glargine insulin and a high protein/low carbohydrate canned diet have a higher likelihood of eventually going into remission and no longer requiring insulin. While some cats may return to insulin dependence in the future, they can have many months or even years when insulin is not required. Owners will be instructed by their veterinarian about the techniques to properly handle and administer insulin injections.

It is necessary to check your diabetic cat’s progress on a regular basis. Monitoring is a joint project between you and your veterinarian. At home, you’ll need to be constantly aware of your cat’s appetite, weight, water consumption and urine output. It is important to feed a consistent amount of food each day so you can be aware of days that your cat either does not eat or is unusually hungry after feeding. Any significant change in your cat’s food intake, weight, water intake or urine output is an indicator that the diabetes is not well controlled, and you should contact your veterinarian.

Your cat’s blood glucose levels will also need to be monitored periodically to make sure the diabetes is regulated. This can be done at the veterinary clinic or you can be taught to do it at home by getting a tiny blood sample from your cat’s ear vein. The glucose readings obtained at home will be more accurate because of the reduced stress to your cat.

The most serious complication of insulin therapy is hypoglycemia or low blood sugar, usually at the peak of insulin activity. The cat will become weak, lethargic and disoriented and may stagger on its feet. Left untreated, this situation may progress to seizures and, in rare cases, even death. If mild signs are observed, feed the cat immediately or give 1 tablespoon of Karo syrup by mouth and consult your veterinarian. If severe symptoms occur, rub Karo syrup onto the cat’s gums and seek emergency veterinary care immediately. Never put food or liquid down the throat of an unconscious or seizuring cat, as it may accidentally enter the airways.

Beyond the monetary cost of diagnosing, stabilizing, treating and maintaining a diabetic cat, with the help of cat insurance, there is a time commitment required of owners. Such a commitment may seem daunting at first, but it can be very rewarding for both owner and cat. It will add to the quality of life and is paid back in years of healthy companionship.

Researching pet insurance

Posted on: September 12th, 2011 by

A cat with cat insurance is seen by a veterinarian.

Posted by: H.M.
For Pets Best Insurance

If you are like many pet owners across the country, you may be considering buying pet insurance for your dog or cat. With veterinary care getting more expensive, taking good care of our furry family members can become a real economic hurdle.

A good dog or cat insurance policy can help with those costs, allowing your pet to receive the best care available. But you will want to do your research carefully because pet insurance costs do vary from plan to plan.

What will be covered?
First, you will need to find out what kinds of veterinary care pet health insurance companies cover. Below are some coverage options to consider:

• Routine – Routine care is usually not covered as part of a basic pet insurance plan. Routine services include physical exams (not related to an illness or injury), vaccinations, some routine lab tests, etc. Companies like Pets Best Insurance offer a plan that includes routine care for an additional monthly fee.

• Vet services related to a health problem – The majority of basic pet insurance plans cover services related to illness, accidents or injuries. This usually includes emergency visits, surgeries, hospitalization, diagnostic lab blood work, tests like MRIs and X-rays, prescription medicines and more.

• Alternative treatments – Another add-on you might consider are “alternative” treatments like chiropractic care or acupuncture. Some companies charge an additional fee for this kind of care, but Pets Best Insurance offers limited annual coverage for chiropractic and acupuncture in its standard plans.

• Levels of care – Many pet insurance companies offer a menu of plans, mainly on different levels like “Basic,” or “Premier” and are priced accordingly.

• “Limited” Coverage – Some cat and dog insurance companies will offer limited coverage for things like pregnancies, hereditary conditions, behavioral problems and mortality expenses.

Know Exactly What Your Costs Will Be
A reliable, high-quality pet insurance company will spell out all the costs and coverage of its plans so you’ll know exactly what you’re paying for, and what you’ll get. You shouldn’t have to worry about unexpected or hidden costs. Ask lots of questions from the customer service representatives until you are satisfied and feel confident in their responses.

Select a Pet Insurance company
After you have researched and factored in all the costs of a plan, you can determine what will be the best pet insurance for you and your pet. Some people will opt for a very basic pet insurance plan, and others may decide a full array of services will suit them. But only you know what will fit into your budget or what is comfortable for you.

For more information about cat and dog insurance, visit www.petsbest.com.

Chunky Pets! How to Help Them Lose

Posted on: September 12th, 2011 by

Hi. I’m Dr. Fiona Caldwell and I’m a practicing veterinarian at Idaho Veterinary Hospital. I’m at home today answering questions from Pets Best Facebook page.

The first question comes from Brenda, who says, “My three-year-old feline is a chunky monkey. She has her dry food monitored but she’s only lost three pounds and needs to lose three more. She’s on Royal Canin Weight Management. It’s the lowest-fat dry food I’ve found. She gets less than a cup a day. What else can I do?”

Cats and dogs are the same as people in that weight loss has to be by burning more calories than they’re taking in. If she has additional weight to lose, she really needs less calories still. Something that you can do would be to cut back that food even just a little bit more. Try to be patient. When you’re a cat and you only weigh 10 or 13 pounds, or whatever your cat weighs right now, that weight loss is going to be really slow. You should aim for probably no more than a pound a month or so. There’s a possibility that if she’s already lost the three, you just need to be a little bit more patient.

You could try switching to a weight management canned food. Canned food tends to have more water content in it, and it’s kind of a bigger amount of food but it’s less dense in terms of its calories. That would be another way you could make her feel like she’s eating more food but actually is taking in less calories. Keep up the good work. A healthy pet is usually a thin pet, so I applaud your efforts there.

The next question also has to do with weight and it comes from Sue. She has a Bichon mix who is very overweight. He’s on weight manage food but it doesn’t seem to be helping. He’s a rescue and has doubled in weight.

We see this sometimes in pets that have been rescued that had poor nutrition before. They never knew when their next meal was going to come so they tried to really eat all the time. What he needs to learn is that his next meal is coming. Great job on getting him on a weight management food, but what you probably need to do now is portion control.

Rather than letting him graze all day with a bowl of weight management food, you’re going to need to actually measure his food. Get an actual measuring cup from the grocery store and follow the back of the bag. Aim for the weight he should be, and aim for the low end of the range that’s on the back of the bag. It’s usually a good place to start.

I recommend feeding dogs twice a day. If he’s the kind of dog that likes to graze all the time and you put the food down and he doesn’t particularly eat it all in one sitting, put his measured amount in. If he doesn’t eat it in 10 minutes or so, then the food goes away and he gets it for dinner. Then the same thing; set it down for dinner, and if he doesn’t eat it that time, take it away and he gets it for breakfast. He’ll figure out eventually that you’re going to take his food away so he’ll learn to eat a whole meal at one time and you’ll have a much easier time with portion control.
www.petsbest.com

Loving Animals: The best gift you can give

Posted on: September 12th, 2011 by

Three cats, with cat insurance, post for photos.

By: Pam Lind
For Pets Best Insurance

As a volunteer at the local animal shelter, I see lots of dog and cat adoptions. Some are successful and result in the “forever family” that we so desperately want for our four-legged residents; however, some are not successful and result in the animal being returned to the shelter.

Typically, returns are due to poor choices on the adopter’s part and are not the animal’s fault. When you adopt a pet, you take responsibility for that animal for its lifetime; therefore, it’s hard to understand why some people don’t put a little more thought into choosing a pet.

Most of my pets have been rescues one way or another and each has added such joy to my life. Over time, I’ve picked up some helpful tips from my volunteer work and from my own animals which can help ensure successful adoption of a rescued pet.

Do your Homework
Homework includes, but is not limited to, determining if you can afford the cost of caring for the animal over its lifetime, deciding what type of animal interests you and is best suited for your lifestyle, getting your home ready for the new addition, and given the cost of veterinary care, you may also wish to research pet insurance policies. If you can’t afford the cost of caring for a pet, don’t get one. You will not be doing you or the animal any favors.

Be Realistic
Although shelters may occasionally receive purebred animals, most of the animals are a mix of other breeds. Shelters do their best to determine the breed mix of an animal; however, it’s not an exact science. Don’t adopt a dog identified as a Labrador mix and then get upset later because you find the dog is exhibiting characteristics associated with another breed. That’s exactly why the animals are identified as MIXES.

Keep an Open Mind
You may have a certain type of dog (or cat) in mind, but once you get to the shelter, you may find another animal which will fit with your family much better than your dream pet. Keep in mind some shelter animals bear physical or emotional issues which will need to be addressed. This “baggage” doesn’t necessarily render an animal unadoptable, it just means he requires extra love and care. Don’t let an animal’s special needs stop you from considering this animal for adoption. As long as you are willing to commit to the extra love, time, effort & expenses that a special needs animal requires, then go for it!

I adopted a paraplegic kitten, Smooches, who is paralyzed in his back legs. I did not know exactly what was wrong with him at the time, but I’ve never regretted bringing him home despite the extra care he requires. Smooches is 10-years-old now and so full of life. He still manages to climb and get around the house thanks to his tremendous upper body strength and a ramp that I built for him. I love that cat like no other because he is SO special. And it is because I love him so much and want him to stay healthy, that I recently obtained cat insurance for him, even though his preexisting conditions will not be covered under the policy.

Be Patient and Expect the Unexpected
Animals, like people, take time to get used to their new surroundings. Each animal will adjust to his new home at a different rate. Their personalities will also have a chance to fully develop so you may see new behaviors that weren’t observed at the shelter. My cat, Megan, who I adopted two months ago, adjusted to her new home almost immediately; however, after a few weeks, we noticed she was getting a bit rough with Smooches. We knew she just wanted to play with him, but his disability makes it difficult for him to play normally. We solved the problem by adopting Ruthie a few weeks ago. Ruthie didn’t adjust to her new home so quickly, hiding under my bed for the first few days and coming out only occasionally. By day 3, she started socializing a bit more and now at the end of week 3 she is practically best friends with Megan, engaging in playful wrestling and mutual bathing.

Love Them
I can’t stress this enough. Love them. You made the effort to bring this precious dog or cat into your family — so love them. It’s a fact that caring for a pet helps us live longer by reducing our stress levels — so love them. It’s not enough to just provide food, shelter and pet health insurance — you have to love them. It’s not enough to just keep them healthy, with or without pet insurance — you have to love them. They give us unconditional love. Don’t they deserve the same?

A treat is just a treat, or is it?

Posted on: September 6th, 2011 by

A dog with dog insurance eats a healthy treat.

By: Judy Luther
Certified Professional Dog Trainer
For Pets Best Insurance

I was recently approached by a veterinarian who expressed concern with a mutual client. The vet saw the client’s dog a few days prior and was astounded by the pet’s recent weight gain. The dog, which should have weighed around 35 pounds, had exploded to a whopping 45 pounds and had elevated kidney values. Considering how unusual the rapid weight gain was, I determined this would be a great post for the pet health insurance enthusiasts and animal lovers out there.

The veterinarian discovered that the client had recently been using chicken breast and roast beef as training treats.

The vet expressed concern about the weight gain and suggested the client use Cheerios instead—to which the client responded, “My trainer said Cheerios were not a high enough reinforcer to reward the dog for learning.”

I often recommend a “high value” reinforcer when training difficult behaviors—which simply means using a treat that a dog goes nuts for! But once the dog knows the behavior, a “lower value” treat can be used. Eventually the dog can be weaned off treats altogether.

While Cheerios may not be as enticing as say, a piece of prime rib, Cheerios are still a valuable treat option. I often tell my clients to fill a jar with the cereal and add a piece of dried salmon. After awhile, the Cheerios will take on the scent and flavor of the salmon, making them even more appealing to the dog.

The above situation caused me think more about proper treats and the many options available. When selecting a good treat, I always focus on finding treats that are healthy, yet reinforcing to the dog. I try to avoid treats that are loaded with unhealthy ingredients and chemicals. One popular treat on the market contains BHA and BHT which are preservatives that can accumulate in the body. Not a choice I want for my dogs, especially when there are many safer options for treats.

Many of my clients are surprised when they see the types of treats I carry in my training bag. My new favorites are dried fruits and vegetables. Most dogs I encounter love bananas, dried pineapple, apples, dried cranberries, sweet potatoes, carrots, green beans and blueberries. When selecting dried fruits, you want to make sure there are no preservatives or added sugar. Also stay away from raisins/grapes—as they can be fatal to dogs if ingested.

There are several companies making wonderful, all natural dog treats from fruits and vegetables. A couple of my favorites are Bite O’ Blue, a combination of blueberries and applesauce made into chewy bite size treats, and Vegatopia, which is a company that makes dog treats from sweet potatoes, bananas, apples and carrots.

In addition to the above treats, I also recommend several other commercial dog treats; Wellness Pure Rewards, Charlee Bear Treats, Itty Bitty Buddy Biscuits and Cloud Star, just to name a few. These are all healthy treats that are just the right size for training. Remember that your dog just needs a taste, so keep the treats small.

Certain foods can be dangerous to your dogs. As mentioned above, never give your dog grapes or raisins. Other foods that can harm your dog include: onions, chocolate, artificial sweeteners and macadamia nuts. Before going through your fridge to find new treat ideas, you should consult with your vet to make sure your treat choices are safe for dogs. Because accidental ingestion can occur even under the watch of the most wary pet owners, pet health insurance is something that should be considered.