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Kevin and The Cat Doctor Part III

Posted on: November 1st, 2011 by

Hello. I’m Dr. Jane Matheys from The Cat Doctor Veterinary Hospital and Hotel in Boise, Idaho. Today I’m going to be answering some questions from the Facebook page of Pets Best Insurance, and we are continuing the series that we call “Kevin and the Cat Doctor”.

Kevin asks me, “My female cat has suddenly taken to spraying the walls and other items such as clothing. Is she just trying to mark her territory or is there a deeper issue to this?”

First of all, Kevin, I’d ask you if you kitty-cat is spayed. Some females who are not spayed will mark their territory, urinating on articles or spraying walls and such, when they’re in heat. So make sure that she is spayed. If she has already has been spayed, then it’s always best that we rule out a medical problem. Some cats, when they have urinary issues, will spray rather than urinating on items on the floor. It’s best that you take your kitty to your veterinarian, have the doctor run a urinalysis and give the kitty a good physical to rule out any medical problems, rather than just assuming that she’s having behavioral issues and just acting up.

Next, Kevin asks, “I’ve been told cats which have been declawed have peculiar habits atypical of normal cats, such as urinating upon furniture. How true is this?”

It is not true. Declawing can be a very controversial subject but I’m happy to report that there have been no studies that have shown that cats that are declawed have any type of elimination problems or any other behavioral problems. So it is okay to declaw your kitties in certain situations.

And finally, Kevin asks, “I’ve been told kidney failure is the great equalizer among cats, so what should I do to reduce this likelihood?”

Unfortunately, we do see a large amount of chronic kidney disease in our older kitty-cats and we’re not entirely sure why this happens. The best way to try to prevent it is by making sure your cat sees your veterinarian for an annual physical, or perhaps even visiting the veterinarian twice a year. At some point as the kitty gets older, your veterinarian will recommend that some blood work and a urinalysis be done. This is very important because that way you can identify kidney disease as soon as possible and there are steps that can be taken to help your kitty’s kidneys work for as long as possible.

Kevin and The Cat Doctor Part I

Posted on: November 1st, 2011 by

Hi. I’m Dr. Jane Matheys from The Cat Doctor Veterinary Hospital and Hotel in Boise, Idaho. I’ll be answering some questions today from the Facebook page of Pets Best Insurance.

This particular segment is called “Kevin and the Cat Doctor”. Kevin was a very busy boy and had lots of questions for us, but I do appreciate that, Kevin, because honestly, the more you know about your kitties, the better you’ll be able to keep your kitties healthy and happy for a long time.

Let’s start off on Kevin’s questions. The first one here is, “If I get a kitten, should I teach it to use the toilet or is that a novel behavior best left alone?”

I’m always amazed at those people that can actually teach their kitties to use the toilet. I don’t know how they do it and I don’t know where they get the patience from. But hey, if you want to try that, I’d say go for it. My only concern is that as a kitty gets older, they may have some problems jumping up onto the toilet if they get arthritis and things of that sort. For younger kitties, give it a try. For most cats, though, in general it’s best to use the old natural method and let them do what comes naturally to them by using a litter box.

Second question. “I recently heard feeding only dry food can lead to kidney problems. Is there a good ratio of dry to canned food?”

Feeding dry food only will not cause kidney problems. We do, unfortunately, see a lot of chronic kidney disease, mostly in our older kitty-cats, and we don’t fully understand why this happens. However, once your kitty is diagnosed with kidney problems, it’s really best to get your cat on a canned food diet. The increased moisture content of the canned food will help the kidneys last a little bit longer. There is no specific ratio. I tell my clients to maximize the amount of canned food fed to those kitties with kidney disease.

Next question. “How does the flea and tick medicine that is applied to the back of the cat’s neck work?” There are several products of this sort and they all basically work about the same. The medication is applied topically on the kitty’s skin. It’s absorbed through the skin into the bloodstream of the cat. It then affects the fleas and ticks by interfering with and damaging their nervous system and that’s how they are killed. They’re a great product, very convenient to use, and I do highly recommend them.

Helping a Cat Lose Weight and Calming a Storm-Scared Dog

Posted on: October 31st, 2011 by

Hi, I’m Dr. Fiona Caldwell and I’m a veterinarian at Idaho Veterinary Hospital. Today I’m answering questions from Pets Best Facebook page.

The first question comes from Kate. She writes, “Any suggestions on helping our kitty lose weight? She’s about 13 pounds.” She goes on to talk about some things that she’s done already to try to get her to lose some weight, such as interactive toys and encouraging her to exercise. She’s on a weight loss prescription diet. Kate has worked with her veterinarian and ruled out underlying diseases and that type of thing. The kitty has stopped gaining weight but isn’t really budging down

I definitely want to applaud you for your weight loss efforts for your cat. Cats can be really tricky to get to lose weight and recognizing that they’ll be healthier at a lower weight is fantastic.

Feeding the prescription reduced-calorie diet is a great place to start. What you’re probably going to need to do is use a simple formula of ‘calories in, calories out’. She’s just going to need less calories.

One thing you might do is actually measure how much she’s eating in 24 hours. Take more than you’ll think she’ll eat, measure it out and put it in the bowl. At the end of 24 hours, put what’s left in there and you can see how much she eats in 24 hours. Then reduce that by 20%. Sometimes that will help kind of jump start that weight loss and get her to lose some weight.

The next one comes from Joanna, who says, “My female Shepherd mix is terrified of storms and reverts back to pottying in the house for a week after the storm has passed. Anything I can do to change this behavior?”

This sounds like pretty classic storm phobia, which unfortunately can be common in dogs. It is not only debilitating for them, but also sort of annoying for you, having to clean up that mess and also deal with her fear at that time.

What I would recommend you do is try working with a behaviorist or consult a veterinarian. There are great anti-anxiety medications that can be used during the time of the storm and in the days that follow to try and keep her from having the anxiety that’s causing the accidents in the house.

An alternative to medication that you might try is called the Thunder Shirt. This is a product that just kind of applies pressure to their body and makes them feel a little bit more secure. Some dogs do really well with it and it helps to lessen their anxiety. What you would do is put the shirt on before the storm, leave it on for as long as you think her anxiety will last, and then take it off.

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Celebrate your kitty!

Posted on: October 31st, 2011 by

A newly adopted kitten with cat insurance sits in a bed.
By: Dr. Jane Matheys
Associate Veterinarian
The Cat Doctor Veterinary Hospital
For Pets Best Insurance

Estimates show that approximately 4 million cats enter shelters every year, and 1 to 2 million of them are euthanized. This got me thinking about my own current four cats who were adopted from local animal shelters or rescued as strays. I had to euthanize my oldest one named Glory B. just this past weekend.

I got her from a shelter when she was 2 years old, and she shared her life with me for over 12 years. I spoiled her rotten, of course, and in her mind every day was a celebration! In return, though, she brought me much love and laughter. Like all of you, I could write a book on all the funny things that she did and experiences that we went through together. he was a wonderful companion, and I miss her terribly.

Cats enrich our lives in so many ways, and there’s so much to love about them– the soft, silky fur, the gentle purrs, the kneading paws, the quiet meows and little chirps. The list goes on and on! But did you know that there are also important health benefits to owning a cat?

Owning a cat can reduce your risk of heart disease. A recent study by researchers at the University of Minnesota found that people who did not own a cat were 30-40% more likely to die from cardiovascular disease, even if they owned dogs. Stroking a cat has been proven to lower blood pressure, and cat owners tend to have lower triglycerides, which reduces the risk of developing and dying from cardiovascular disease.

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Cat ownership has also been shown to boost the levels of mood-regulating neurotransmitters such as dopamine and serotonin. As such, cats can reduce feelings of stress, loneliness, anxiety, depression, and other negative states.

Elderly people are particularly likely to benefit from the health-protective effects of cat ownership. Those with cats are less inclined to suffer heart attacks, their blood pressure is lower on average, they report less tension and stress, and they live longer overall. With all the health benefits cats provide, it’s important that we give them something back. This is where pet health insurance comes in. Companies like Pets Best Insurance offer cat insurance plans that reimburse 80% of your kitty’s vet bill after a deductible.

Cats offer protection against a number of health problems. If adopted before or shortly after a child is born, they reduce the risk of developing animal allergies, asthma, and possibly other illnesses as well. Children who are in a home with cats tend to miss an average of 9 days less of school a year than children who do not live with cats. Children who own cats learn responsibility and show more empathy towards others and are more willing to help others. Cats teach children about body language and other non-verbal cues as well. Cats provide unconditional love and acceptance, which can help children through difficult times. Additionally, cats can provide therapeutic benefits for children with conditions such as autism.

If you have room in your heart and your home for a forever friend, consider adopting a cat. Please visit your local shelter to find a whole lot of love waiting for you inside! For more information about cat health care and cat insurance, visit www.petsbest.com.

Top 7 Halloween dog tips

Posted on: October 27th, 2011 by

Two puppies with dog insurance sniff Halloween candy.

By: Liam Crowe
Bark Busters CEO
Guest Blogger
For Pets Best Insurance

While many of us revel in all the spooky and unusual events Halloween brings, these unfamiliar happenings can quickly become a real nightmare for our canine companions. It’s a great idea to have dog insurance for your pet in the event of a holiday mishap, but the below are some tips to make sure this Halloween is full of treats, not tricks, for your dog.

TRICK: Leaving your dog out in a fenced yard during trick-or-treat festivities. It is often a natural instinct for dogs to protect the family from strangers, and there will be plenty coming and going on Halloween.
TREAT: Bring your dog inside so you know he and visitors to your home will be safe. If your dog usually stays outside, bring him in a few times before the big fright night to get him used to being inside— sudden changes can put more stress on your dog.

TRICK: Allowing your timid or over-exuberant dog to help answer the door. Whether your dog is wary of newcomers or wants to cover everyone who rings the doorbell with kisses, this creates a potentially dangerous situation for your dog and your guests.
TREAT: Create a safe place you can direct your dog to go anytime he is overwhelmed by visitors or household hubbub, such as a crate, pillow or bed. During trick or treat hours, it is best to keep him in a separate room away from the front door to limit his excitability, aggression, and chance of running outside and becoming lost.

TRICK: Giving your dog an unusual amount of attention if he is stressed by Halloween activities.
TREAT: The best thing you can do for your dog when he is feeling unsettled is to act normally. By over-reassuring your dog, you can inadvertently communicate to him that because you are acting differently, there must be something to worry about.

TRICK: Showing off your family’s new costumes to your dog. He may see you as strangers if you don your costumes without warning.
TREAT: Before you or the kids put on your costumes, allow your dog to scent them. Keep any masks off when you are with your dog, as dogs can become confused and stressed when they can’t see our faces.

TRICK: Not leaving ID tags on your dog at all times.
TREAT: With all the extra commotion and comings and goings, be sure identification tags are secure on your dog’s collar—just in case. And pet health insurance is an option that can give you even more peace of mind, knowing that you will be able to take care of any injuries that could occur if your dog was to run away in fear.

TRICK: Placing lit jack o’ lanterns at dog-level.
TREAT: Excited or stressed dogs (and their swinging tails!) can easily knock over a lit candle or pumpkin. While you’ll want to avoid this altogether, it’s a good idea to have dog insurance in case of any holiday accidents. Be sure to keep all jack o’ lanterns out of your dog’s reach, or consider a battery-powered candle that does not burn. It is also a good idea to allow your dog to see and scent carved pumpkin decorations before dark, without the candles. Those ghoulish faces can look very scary, especially from a dog’s eye view in the dark.

TRICK: Forcing your dog to wear a Halloween costume.
TREAT: Experiment before Halloween to see if your dog likes being in a costume. If so, fine— he’ll most likely enjoy himself and the extra attention his new look brings! However, if he shows any resistance, don’t force him to spend an already stressful night in discomfort. Try a fancy collar or a bandana around his neck instead.

If you want to include your dog in Halloween festivities, just be sure you think first about his safety and emotional stress level—much like you would for a small child. Your dog does not instinctively understand Halloween, and he needs you to provide guidance and safety measures to keep it a night full of fun, not fright. For more training tips, visit Bark Busters.

For more pet health and behavior tips, visit www.petsbest.com.