My Vet’s the Best Finalist: Dr. Corrina Parsons

My Vet's the Best finalist, Dr. Corrina Parsons.

Five years ago, Pets Best developed the My Vet’s the Best Contest to acknowledge notable veterinarians around the nation. November concludes our final contest of 2015, and we’re again moved by the thousands of pet owners who shared heartfelt stories in nominating their vets for outstanding service and compassionate care. As we announce our eight finalists, it is clear that many selfless veterinarians around the nation are making a tremendous impact upon the pets and pet owners in their local communities. Meet Dr. Corrina Parsons who is one such veterinarian and a finalist in the third round of this year’s contest.

After graduating from the University of Pennsylvania in 1999, Dr. Parsons completed an internship in large animal medicine and surgery at the University of Georgia. She then completed a residency at New Bolton Center in 2002, and received acupuncture training from Colorado State University. Her interests include internal medicine (in which she is board certified) and alternative medicine. She now practices at Longwood Veterinary Center in Kennett Square, Pennsylvania.Read More…

My Vet’s the Best Finalist: Dr. Morna Pixton

My Vet's the Best finalist, Dr. Morna Pixton.

Five years ago, Pets Best developed the My Vet’s the Best Contest to acknowledge notable veterinarians around the nation. November concludes our final contest of 2015, and we’re again moved by the thousands of pet owners who shared heartfelt stories in nominating their vets for outstanding service and compassionate care. As we announce our seven finalists, it is clear that many selfless veterinarians around the nation are making a tremendous impact upon the pets and pet owners in their local communities. Meet Dr. Morna Pixton who is one such veterinarian and a finalist in the third round of this year’s contest.

Born in Berkeley, California, Dr. Pixton grew up in upstate New York, then graduated cum laude from Yale University. She later attended Cornell University’s College of Veterinary Medicine, where she graduated with honors. Dr. Pixton joined Guilford Veterinary Hospital and became a partner at the hospital in 2008.Read More…

6 Dangerous Thanksgiving Foods for Pets

A black labrador dog eyes a plate full of food at Thanksgiving.

By Dr. Eva Evans, a veterinarian and writer for pet health insurance agency, Pets Best.

It’s that time of year again! Thanksgiving is almost here, and that means an abundance of delicious food. However, many food items that people enjoy aren’t healthy for pets to consume. This is important to remember during holiday meals, when dogs and cats beg for table scraps and guests might fall for those cute faces. To ensure your pets remain healthy this Thanksgiving, below are six dishes to keep away from your pets. Be sure to inform your family and dinner guests about these potentially toxic or dangerous foods so they do not feed them to your pets.

1.Stuffing

Thanksgiving dressing is often made with onions, scallions or garlic. These ingredients are extremely toxic to dogs and cats and can cause a life-threatening anemia (destruction of the red blood cells). It’s best to avoid feeding any amount of stuffing to pets.

2. Ham

Ham and other pork products can cause pancreatitis, upset stomach, vomiting and diarrhea. Ham tends to be high in fat as well, which can lead to obesity in pets. Even a small amount of ham can contribute a very large amount of calories in a small dog or cat.

3. Turkey BonesRead More…

Cat Breed Guide: Oriental Shorthair

An Oriental Shorthair cat with pet insurance from Pets Best.By Dr. Fiona, a veterinarian and writer for Pets Best, a dog insurance and cat insurance agency.

About the Oriental Shorthair

Weight:  9-12lb, females are smaller.

Points of conformation: Medium body size with long slender limbs and long tapered nose.  The neck is long and thin, and the tail is also long and thin, almost whip-like.  Paws are small and compact.

Coat: Very short, close laying and soft textured hair coat.

Color: All colors and patterns accepted.

Grooming needs: Minimal grooming needs.

Origin: Thailand

Behavior Traits: Extroverted and playful

Is an Oriental Shorthair cat right for You?Read More…

5 Signs Your Pet Ingested Ice Melt

A dog eats the snow and ice melter

From Pets Best, a pet insurance agency for dogs and cats.

As the snow and ice begin to blanket the ground, so does the ice melt. While ice melt is important for our safety, it can mean health issues for your dogs and cats.

The biggest pet health danger is ingestion of the ice melt salt, either while outside or after a walk when pets clean their paws. Additionally, walking on small rocks of salt can cause paw irritation, especially if the paws are dry and cracked due to cold winter air.

The main chemical found in most salts and ice melts is chloride. According to animal expert and speaker Diana Guerrero, sodium chloride, potassium chloride, and magnesium chloride are often found in ice melts and should not be ingested by pets. According to veterinarian Dr. Eva Evans, health care issues can arise from ingesting those ingredients. Here are five signs and symptoms to watch for in your dog or cat:

1. Increased urinationRead More…

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