Pet Insurance Blog – Pets Best Insurance
Get a Pet Insurance Quoteor call 877-738-7237

2nd Annual Dog Paws & Santa Claus Photos Event

Posted on: November 10th, 2014 by

Dogs insured with Pets Best pose with Santa.

Be sure to join us for the 2nd annual Pets Best “Dog Paws & Santa Claus” Photos. Santa photos make great holiday cards and you’ll be supporting two animal shelters in our Boise and Meridian, Idaho communities!

Bring your family, furry ones included, and get holiday photos with Santa! The photo event will be Tuesday, Nov. 18th, 2014 from 5:30pm-8:30pm at the Pets Best office located at 2323 S. Vista Ave., Suite 100, Boise, 83705.

The cost is a $10 cash donation. All donations go to The Idaho Humane Society (Boise, Idaho) and The Meridian Valley Humane Society (Meridian, Idaho). Photos will be taken on a first come, first serve basis.

Be sure to spread the word! Share our Pets Best Facebook posts about the “Dog Paws & Santa Claus” Photos event!

We look forward to seeing you and your family on the evening of Tuesday, November 18th!

An RSVP is encouraged for planning purposes, but not mandatory. You can let us know you’re coming here: http://www.surveygizmo.com/s3/1328231/Pets-Best-Photo-Shoot

Should Dogs Wear Coats?

Posted on: November 7th, 2014 by

A golden retriever puppy wears a coat in the snow.

By Dr. Eva Evans, a veterinarian and writer for Pets Best, a pet health insurance agency for dogs and cats.

It’s that time of the year again. The weather is getting colder! Our furry friends still like to spend time outside, but do they need protective clothing such as sweaters and coats? In most cases, the answer is no. Most dogs have enough fur to keep them warm outside during the winter. When making the decision on whether to put warm winter clothing on your dog, you should consider your dog’s size, breed and the outside temperature.

Very small dogs have a harder time retaining body heat, so they may need a sweater or coat when outside for extended periods of time during the winter. If your dog is a short haired breed or a breed that is originally from a warm climate, they may also need cold weather wear.

These breeds include dogs such as the Chinese Crested, Chihuahua and Italian Greyhound. Dogs that have long hair such as the Pomeranian, Chow Chow, Husky and Great Pyrenees do not need additional clothing during the winter. Additionally, the outside temperature and length of time outside should also be considered when deciding whether or not your dog needs to wear a coat. Dogs in temperatures greater than 45 degrees typically do not need protective clothing. If your dog will only be outside for 10 minutes or less, they typically do not need any clothing except in extremely cold climates.

Read More…

Ebola in Dogs & Cats – What You Need to Know

Posted on: November 5th, 2014 by
Bentley the dog was released from Ebola quarantine on Nov 1 2014.

Nina Pham, the Dallas nurse who survived Ebola was reunited with her dog, Bentley, on Saturday Nov. 1 after he was released from quarantine. (Photo Credit: City of Dallas)

By Dr. Eva Evans, a veterinarian and writer for Pets Best, a pet insurance agency for dogs and cats.

As the global Ebola virus outbreak worsens, pet owners are starting to wonder how their animals could be affected by the virus. Recently, a dog belonging to a Spanish healthcare worker was euthanized by Spanish health officials because of fears that the dog could transmit the deadly virus. The Dallas nurse, Nina Pham, who recently became the first person to contract Ebola in the United States is also a pet owner. The local authorities in Dallas quarantined her dog, but Pham is now an Ebola survivor and her dog was released from quarantine on Nov. 1st after being cleared of not having Ebola. With conflicting views on pets in the Ebola crisis, should we be concerned about our pets contracting or transmitting Ebola?

Ebola is a zoonotic disease, which means that it can be transmitted to humans from other species. It is well known that Ebola can be contracted in humans from certain animals such as fruit bats and non-human primates such as apes and monkeys. The virus is spread through direct contact with blood or bodily fluids from an infected person or animal such as bats or monkeys. Animal to human transmission typically occurs from eating bush meat from infected animals. Dogs and cats that have been exposed to Ebola will form antibodies which tell us that their immune system is responding to the presence of the virus. However, there is no evidence that they become sick or show any symptoms from the virus. Additionally, there is currently no proof that dogs and cats can pass on the Ebola virus to humans.

Read More…

Cat Breed Guide: Birman Cat

Posted on: November 3rd, 2014 by

A Birman breed of cat with pet health insurance.By Dr. Fiona is a veterinarian and writer for Pets Best, a cat insurance and dog insurance agency.

About the  Birman Cat

Weight:  10-18 lb

Points of conformation: Face resembles a Siamese, but is rounder and fuller.  They are heavier boned than Siamese, and have small wide set ears.  They have large round paws and are long bodied.

Coat: Medium-long single coat.

Color: Kittens are born white and then develops the seal points.  White mittens 1/2 to 3/4 up to the ankles is desired.

Grooming needs: Low to moderate, daily brushing is recommended.

Origin: Burma (Myanmar)

Behavior Traits: Playful and friendly, but with a territorial tendency.

Is a Birman Cat Right for You?

Read More…

Do’s and Don’ts for Rescuing Wildlife

Posted on: October 30th, 2014 by

a baby deerBy Arden Moore, a certified dog and cat behaviorist with the International Association of Animal Behavior Consultants. Arden is an author, radio host, and writer for Pets Best, a pet insurance agency for dogs and cats.

If a baby bird fell out of nest and landed in your front lawn, would you know what to do? And what not to do?

Or, let’s say you look out your sprawling, wooded backyard and see a fawn limping or even laying still. Should you approach?

October is designated as National Animal Safety and Prevention Month. Created by the PALS Foundation, this campaign is aimed at educating the public on the proper ways to handle and care for not only family pets but also wildlife. It is the ideal time to acknowledge the need to do our part to ensure we coexist with all animals in nature.

Read More…